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Event Category: MindCORE Seminar Series

  • Category MindCORE Seminar Series
  • From January 1, 2018
  • To October 29, 2020

Rebecca Waller Department of Psychology University of Pennsylvania   The Developmental Origins of Callous-Unemotional Traits   Callous-unemotional (CU) traits are critical to understanding the development of severe forms of aggression and antisocial behavior. CU traits include deficits in empathy and prosocial behavior, as well as reduced interpersonal sensitivity to others. In this talk, I will […]

Julia Leonard MindCORE Postdoctoral Fellow University of Pennsylvania   How social evidence affects persistence in early childhood   Children’s persistence in the face of challenge is central to learning. But how do young children learn when and how to deploy effort? This talk explores how social evidence impacts children’s decisions about effort allocation. First, I […]

Catherine Hartley Department of Psychology NYU   Developmental tuning of action selection   Computational reinforcement learning models provide a framework for understanding how individuals can evaluate which actions are beneficial and which are best avoided. To date, these models have primarily been leveraged to understand learning and decision-making in adults. In this talk, I will […]

John Krakauer Professor of Neurology, Neuroscience, & Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine   Exploring the cognitive-motor interface: motor skill, movement imitation, and procedural memory   The notion of motor skill will be discussed, along with experimental results addressing it. Then I will discuss the basis for ability to imitate and […]

Sam Gershman Department of Psychology Center for Brain Science Harvard University   The compositional nature of human function learning   How do people recognize and learn about complex functional structure? Taking inspiration from other areas of cognitive science, I argue that this is achieved by harnessing compositionality: complex structure is decomposed into simpler building blocks. […]